Low-dose Naltrexone (LDN)

What is LDN?

Naltrexone is in a class of drug known as an opiate antagonists. Its normal use is in treating addiction to opiate drugs such as heroin or morphine. The dose used for this purpose is usually between 50 and 300mg daily.  


A low dose of Naltrexone (0.5 to 1.5) has been used to help with symptoms of some autoimmune conditions since 1985.  This method was devised and subsequently developed by the late Dr Bernard Bihari, M.D., a physician from New York, USA who passed away May 16, 2010. Dr Bihari was qualified in Internal Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology, and we hope to honor him by continuing his pioneering work. 


Low-dose Naltrexone is most commonly used with Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia Syndrome and Chronic Fatigue. 


*LDN is not routinely prescribed by physicians because many of them are simply not aware of the positive effects it can have. Since it is a generic medication, there is no marketing campaigns to increase awareness of LDN in the medical community.  


For more information on LDN and how to get started please book a free consultation. 




Learn More

The following information is taken from the LDN Research Trust website, for more information visit 


www.ldnresearchtrust.org  


www.ldnscience.org



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